I dislike exactly two things about the reader mode: (1) it replaces the URL with an about:reader one, but keeps displaying the original one in the address bar (so I don't see why bookmarks are separate with and without it) (2) it's too common in Web design to make pages unreadable when it's disabled.

xkcd.com/1205/ might be a good rule when working, but not when using a computer at home: automating the task might be more fun, I might learn more, while spending much more time than just doing the task. (I'm not sure this would convince me to learn the Emacs style of regular expressions; I always have to guess how many backslashes to add to turn a trivial POSIX ERE into an Emacs regexp.)

Received the . I was surprised seeing the envelope with proper diacritics in my name and address when Polish companies still use replacement character boxes in invoices.

Seen a "disable adblock or register" banner (disabling adblock doesn't hide it); it should have been "practice element hiding or disable and get tracked more".

@cwebber @natecull It looks easier with writers only, not parsers, in client libraries. Cases like PostgreSQL getting a new feature, or implementing such a library in a new programming language, are very good arguments for a consistent protocol syntax. (Or being able to hack tools for e.g. generating a smaller query reproducing a bug.)

@cwebber @natecull Isn't this solved by libraries like SQLAlchemy Core? Any text protocol might have attacks like SQL injections; I have seen code not escaping ' in JSON, there are attacks on apps accepting newlines in HTTP headers. Or is the problem in libraries (not protocols and languages) treating SQL/HTML/... as text?

Set up a Mastodon instance; finally had an opportunity to use Docker with a real-world application.

Mastodon

mtjm.eu is one server in the network